Posts

ME & MY LEFT BRAIN - ALEX LYKOS' CREATIVE JOURNEY

Image
Film making is a tough business, independent film making doubly so. Alex Lykos’ ME & MY LEFT BRAIN tells the story of Arthur, a struggling actor, also struggling with relationships, while being entirely distracted by his inner critic, his left brain, which is personified in the film by Mal Kennard.
During a restless night, Arthur’s insomnia amplifies his regrets and insecurities, as he suffers while replaying times spent with his fixation Helen (Chantelle Barry), attempting to decipher whether she is legitimately interested in him or not.


Ably captured through the lens by Kent Marcus, and compiled by Miriana Marusic, the film is a romantic comedy romp, reminiscent of works by Woody Allen, not only reflected in the centrepiece of an anti-hero, but also by the soundtrack, an original and impressive jazz score by Cezary Skubiszewski.
In the attached podcast, Alex goes beyond speaking about the technicalities of film making, and delves into the struggle and elation of bringing a sto…

SMUGGLERS LOOT AS ART – NOW SHOWING

Image
There’s always that sense of anxiety as one approaches the customs officials, hoping that the declaration form has been filled-out correctly, and that nothing has been overlooked, or inadvertently packed with items locally classed as contraband.
But still, travellers around the world constantly seek to wilfully smuggle illegal goods past customs officials, sometimes successfully, but most often caught and confiscated, with subsequent charges and fines.
Such is the subject of an exhibition of American artist Taryn Simon’s work at the Anna Schwartz Gallery in Melbourne. Taryn is showing her series Contraband for the first time in Australia,
Contraband comprises of 1,075 photographs taken at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Federal Inspection Site and the U.S. Postal Service International Mail Facility, both located at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. For one full working week, 24 hours per day, the artist remained on site, photographing items detained or seized f…

MARRUGEKU'S TRIPLE BILL OF DANCE AT CARRIAGEWORKS

Image
Combine the raw and complex forms of indigenous dance and movement with background animations, violin accompaniment and Belgian direction, and Marrugeku’s remarkable presence on stage is reinforced again as a combination of music, storytelling and dance. Marrugeku are recognised as leading change makers in intercultural contemporary dance, dedicated to Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians developing dance languages that surprise audiences, generate thought and consistently impress.
Over three nights (30 May – 1 June) at Carriageworks, the company presents Burrbgaja Yalirra(Dancing Forwards), a triple bill of solo works curated by Marrugeku’s artistic directors Dalisa Pigram and Rachael Swain. All three works explore the complexity of exchanging privileges between races and culture, aiming to challenge the mainstream understanding of history and relationships with the land.
Marrugeku performers come from diverse backgrounds and disciplines, collaborating to co-create each product…

GRAMMY-NOMINATED TENOR LEADS PINCHGUT'S UPCOMING EPIC

Image
Written during the final five years of Claudio Monteverdi’s life and widely acclaimed as his crowning achievement, The Return of Ulysses was his first opera for the city of Venice, a city known for a network of thriving and competing opera houses. Combining an action-packed plot with a musical exploration of the full range of human emotions, The Return of Ulysses broke new musical ground at its Venice premiere way back in 1640.
For a limited season this June, Sydneysiders can enjoy The Return of Ulysses in grand style, based on the closing chapters of Homer’s Odyssey. The performance, staged by Pinchgut Opera, features Portuguese tenor Fernando Guimarães in the title role. Fernando was last seen in Australia in the Australian Brandenburg Orchestra’s Handel: Heaven. He has sung the role of Ulysses to international acclaim including a double Grammy nomination in 2015 for his portrayal with Boston Baroque.
Australian mezzo-soprano Catherine Carby, whose performances have earned her rav…

HOPLEY’S MONOPOLY REFLECTS LIFE, LOVE AND THE DAILY STRUGGLE

Image
It’s hard not to appreciate the work of a committed live theatre artist who writes and directs (and sometimes also often acts in his own productions), ensuring that the nuance, delivery and rhythm of each line is delivered with connecting cadence and expression.

In Monopoly however, Steven Hopley steps off the stage, and presents us with a superbly balanced cast to deliver his masterpiece of class distinction, relationship struggles and home-ownership impossibility, set amongst a group of friends undertaking their regular weekly challenge of playing the Monopoly board game.
With a writing style as relevant as Williamson in his heyday, Monopoly should come to be considered the parochial ‘2nd decade of the millennium’ study text for English and drama students in Australia. Quick witted, funny with a serious undertone, the players raise the stakes on this particular evening by wagering their possessions available in the real world.
The character leading the game at any one moment change…

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL RETURNS TO AUSTRALIA FOR 2019

Image
When it comes to Cirque Du Soleil, thankfully what happens in Vegas doesn’t always stay in Vegas. The hottest ticket in the gambling town remains any one of the current Cirque Du Soleil performances (there are up to 7 shows from the famed circus team underway in Vegas), but Australians are soon to be treated to the their newest, KURIOS – Cabinet of Curiosities, from October this year.
Premiering under their Big Top on 2 October 2019 in Sydney at Entertainment Quarter, Kurios is a tale in which time appears to come to a complete stop, transporting the audience inside a fantasy world where everything is possible.  In this realm, set in the latter half of the nineteenth century, reality appears relative as our perception of what is real and what is not becomes transformed.
Originally composed of 20 street performers in 1984, Cirque du Soleil completely reinvented circus arts and went on to become a world leader in live entertainment.  Established in Montreal, the Canadian organisation h…

GLUGS RECOGNISE EXCELLENCE IN THEATRE

Image
Not as prestigious as the Oscars, and it’s definitely not the Tonys, but for a committed group of Sydney theatre goers, their yearly awards recognising the best in live drama is as noteworthy as any other award (full list of nominees and winners below). Calling themselves the GLUGS (named after the characters in a CJ Dennis poem), the group meets every month or so, and while enjoying good food and wine, discuss the virtues of the latest show, and generally hear from a luminary of the industry.

And so it is that this year the members praised the work of those who entertained us over 2018, with many of the winners taking the time to attend. This is not an awards project determined by committee, but rather by those who love the art and support it by attending shows as often as one each week…sometimes more. There’s neither pomp nor circumstance at the awards function. No 100 piece orchestra in the pit, no elaborate staging, no burlesque opening number.

Rather, guests sit casually around …